All-School Calendar

Though Julia Saltzman '17 graduated in early June, she still managed to wow speech and debate judges on behalf of Laurel in Birmingham, Alabama where, as one of 250 qualifiers, she competed at the National Tournament in late June. As a member of Laurel's Speech and Debate team for four years, Julia was a three-time State qualifier. She capped off her Speech and Debate career at Laurel with six rounds of speeches at the National Tournament. Her stellar performance propelled her into the quarter finals, making her one of the top 60 Extemporaneous speakers in the country. Cleveland.com recently highlighter her accolades in its Chagrin Falls Community Blog. You can read the update here.

Ann V. Klotz was recently quoted in Crain's Cleveland Business regarding the Mastery Transcript Consortium, a group that wants to rebuild how high schools record their students abilities and achievements and, in turn, upend how colleges and universities evaluate their applicants. Laurel School is a member of the consortium and Ms. Klotz is quoted saying, "It's been a long time coming in this country for significant education reform. We want to be on the ground floor with something that has the potential to make real lasting change for our kids." The article states that "How this transcript of the future might look is still in the works, but the idea is to develop one that signifies the complete "mastery" of a specific skill. Rather than be organized around a specific academic department, the mastery transcript model is organized around performance areas — like leadership, communication, ethical decision-making, etc. The performance areas and credit standards would be tailored to the individual crediting school, but the idea is to create a consistent format across schools." Read the full story here.
Lisa Damour, Ph.D., Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls, authored two pieces featured in the New York Times this month. The first, titled "Asking Girls and Boys, What Would Wonder Woman Do?" highlights the importance of "making Wonder-Woman a full-family experience." In her column Lisa states that the film "can open conversations with our children about how they might use their own influence. Would our daughters and sons stand passively by if they saw someone being bullied? Or would they use their own power to stick up for those who have less of it?" Her second column, titled "No, Your Teen Doesn't Hate You. It's Just Summer," explains how teens need to have alone time. She states that "Teenagers are charged with the impossible project of becoming independent while still sleeping under our roofs. To accomplish this paradoxical task, they distance themselves psychologically in order to prepare to part physically." Her column goes on to state that complaining isn't unusual, teens generally do hear their parents despite eye rolls, and the quirks don't generally last.

The Top Workplaces 2017 was recently issued by the Cleveland Plain Dealer and Laurel was included among the top 50 companies (150-499 employees) on the list! In addition, Ann V. Klotz was included in a story that accompanied the list, which offered advice on leadership versus "just being bossy." Ann is quoted saying, "Not everybody needs to be a stand-on-the-table leader who gives orders and makes a lot of noise. What I try to do is set an example that everybody needs to really choose their abilities, and not be afraid of or apologize for the abilities that don't come naturally. We put a lot of pressure on kids to do everything well, to check all the boxes, when they can excel in different ways." She goes on to say that "Leadership isn't always about being the boss; leadership is about shining the light on other people." Click here to read the full story.

Laurel Seventh Graders took a field trip back to the year 600 A.D. when they spent their last two weeks of the school year on a simulated archeological dig that took place at the Butler Campus. It was there that the students made discoveries about the Whittlesey  tribe -- Paleo Indians who lived along the Cuyahoga River from 600-1000 A.D. Reporter Lynn Ischay with the Plain Dealer paid a visit to the site to learn more about The Dig and what they were uncovering. Her resulting story, "Laurel School Students Dig Archeology" featured an album of photos that helped show readers how impactful outdoor learning can be for students. 

Carrie Ruhrkraut, Grade Seven team leader and Middle School math teacher was included in the story stating, "This is the culmination of their Humanities program. We debated the use of Native Americans as mascots, from their perspective as seventh graders. After they unearth this Whittlesy site, we'll talk about whether or not their perspectives have changed." The reporter commented that "While on the site, the girls were in constant motion, kneeling on the wet sand, carefully scraping or brushing layer after layer, in search of clues to the Whittlesy lifestyle. They worked with their partners, screening bucketsful of sand, then running to help another student plot the location of her find on the 2x2 grid." Click here for the full story.


When the Chagrin Valley Times visited LaureLive on June 11 reporter Ryan Dentscheff noted that "unlike many multi-day music festivals across the county, a noticeable portion of the guests were children." When he sat down with Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz to discuss the two-day festival and Laurel's involvement in the event, Ms. Klotz stated that "We did not want to be Bonnaroo. We wanted to be something that you could bring your primary school aged children to. That was important to us and important too that there be things for little kids to do because it's a drag if you come to something and there's nothing for your children." Ann also commented on the variety of the vendors at the event, all of which are local. "I believe that each of us in this region of the country needs to invest in Cleveland and in Northeast Ohio, and this is part of our making a contribution -- bringing great music, a cool event that we don't have anything quite like it and showcasing our incredible campus." Click here to read the full article. The Cleveland Jewish News also paid a visit to the festival and spoke with Rachael Grossman '17 who worked closely with Elevation Group, who partnered with Laurel to produce the event. The story titled "Student Help with Production of LaureLive 2017" can be found online.

"There are glamorous aspects to putting on a music festival—like booking bands—and some less-than-glamorous aspects—like determining how many Porta Pottys you’ll need," reported Andrew Cass of The News-Herald, who visited with a few Laurel students and staff on day two of this year's LaureLive. The story highlight's the partnership Laurel established with The Elevation Group, whose owners taught a semester-long elective where students took away lessons that go far beyond music. Antonina (Nina) Schubert '17 states in the piece that she has "Always had a passion for music. Seeing how something like this is put together is really cool. It’s a behind-the-scenes look.” Doing her Senior Project with The Elevation Group, she was able get an even closer look at the process, working side by side with the owners. Olivia Savona '19 shadowed the stage manager during the festival. That job gave her a better appreciation for what goes into a concert. She had the opportunity to speak to someone working the lights, getting an inside look at what they do. “It’s a lot more than just music. There are bits and pieces that can interest anyone," she was quoted saying.

The Plain Dealer also paid a visit to the festival. Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz is quoted in the piece stating, "Music with a Mission ties into Laurel's mission to inspire each girl to fulfill her promise and to better the world. I love what LaureLive offers our girls, who are given the opportunity to learn about and participate in the process from start to finish and take that experience with them once they leave the walls of Laurel."


WOIO paid a visit to LaureLive on Saturday, June 10 and saw firsthand how Laurel students played a role in the production of the two-day music festival taking place at Laurel's Butler Campus. Danielle Vinokur '17 was interviewed about her experience and was featured saying, "We saw press releases being written, we went to interviews with radio stations, so it was really cool seeing everything going on." Rising Junior Brynn Pierce '19 was also interviewed about what she has learned. "I've learned everything, from how much it costs to put on something like this to all the little details we have to pay attention to, to make everyone happy at our concert. It's awesome. I think that this is a good way to see whether or not you might like the music industry."

Trey Wilson, Laurel's Director of Strategic Partnerships, and Headmistress Ann V. Klotz were also on camera for the story. Ms. Klotz stated, "I am so excited that this festival gives the opportunity to put real-life learning into action for our girls. For them to be both entrepreneurial and think about their creative side is a pretty amazing opportunity at Laurel." View the full story online here.

The buzz around the second LaureLive, taking place June 10-11, 2017, started early this year when the Chagrin Valley Times wrote a story titled, "Laurel Students Behind Scenes of Music Fest." The article highlights the elective roughly 25 students chose to take that kicked off in January where they met each week with the owners of Elevation Group, the production company Laurel partnered with to put on LaureLive. The class focused on all aspects of producing an event of this magnitude--from securing and working with talent to merchandising, insurance and permitting. The class looked at all aspects of production and LaureLive weekend is the culmination of those efforts, where the students all will have the opportunity to participate in a hands-on way. The article quotes Trey Wilson, Laurel's Director of Strategic Partnerships, who states that "This isn't happening in a vacuum. They're not just jumping in and doing one weekend without thinking of the preparation that went into it. They get a broad overview from people that have genuine expertise and during the weekend, they will have a way to engage in the event itself. From where I sit, that's a really effective model." Molly Easly '17 and Rachael Grossman '18, both of whom have been working closely with Elevation Group outside of the class, are also featured in the article talking about their role in the event and their take on the overall experience. 

Additional media highlights of Laurel students and their participation in LaureLive appeared in Cleveland.com, where Peighton Taylor '18 was interviewed and the Cleveland Jewish News.

Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz sat down with Micki Byrnes, President and General Manager of WKYC Channel 3 - Cleveland, for a “Square Talk” segment that aired on May 14. Ms. Klotz addressed the topics of girls and math, women and STEM careers, and the growing strength of all-girls’ schools throughout the country. View the full interview here.

Nurse's Office

The primary health care of the student is the responsibility of the parent/guardian. The School Nurse is responsible for the overall administration of the school’s Health Services Program and to be a support system to this primary care. We are not here to diagnose conditions or prescribe medical treatments.

Being healthy and having positive self-esteem are two important factors in being able to learn. Please be sure your student is well rested and nourished before coming to school each day. Personal hygiene is essential for good health and self-esteem. Students need to be encouraged to be responsible to be clean: body, hair and teeth on a daily basis.

Susan Kramer, RN, BSN
School Nurse
216-455-3060
sKramer@LaurelSchool.org 

Illness

  • If your child is not feeling well keep them home.
  • Sending a sick child to school only gets the other students sick.
  • If your child has had a fever over 99.9 they MUST stay home for 24 hours. They can return when they are fever free for 24 hours without the aid of medication.
  • If your child has vomited they MUST stay home for 24 hours.
  • If your child has diarrhea they MUST stay home for 24 hours.
  • For example if your child is vomiting at 9:00 PM, they are not to come to school the next day; they need to remain out for a full 24 hours.
  • If your child is being tested for strep throat they must remain out of school until the test results are confirmed from the physician’s office. (See handbook).
  • Please report any communicable disease (Strep throat, pink eye, head lice, etc.) to the Nurse’s Office immediately so families can be notified. Do not return to school until treatment has occurred or there is documentation that the child is free of communicable disease.
  • The single most effective prevention against the spread of germs and disease is hand washing.

Health Screening (Vision and Hearing)

  • The state mandates vision and hearing screening for all Early Childhood, Kindergarten, 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th (vision only), 9th, and 11th (hearing only) graders and students new to the district. 
  • This screening takes place throughout the year. If any problems are identified, parents/guardians will be notified. 
  • Students should have their corrective lenses with them in school at all times.

Immunizations

  • All students in Ohio are required to have up-to-date immunizations documented and on file. Please use the Ohio Department of Health Immunization Report (see forms) or a copy from your physician’s office. The Ohio Revised Code mandates that pupils (age/grade level appropriate) be protected against the following diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis, hepatitis B, varicella, and haemophilus influenzae Type B.
  • Updated immunization records are required (aside from initial entry to Laurel) for Kindergarten, 7th and 12th grade.
    • Kindergarten- additional vaccines required are the DTaP; Polio and MMR
    • Entry to 7th and 8th- a Tdap and a the first dose of Meningococcal
    • Entry to 12th – the second dose of Meningococcal
  • These immunizations can be obtained from your regular physician. The Shaker Heights Department of Health at 3400 Lee Road offers these immunizations for a fee. Please contact the health department at 216-491-1418 for information or to make an appointment.
  • The State of Oho allows immunization exemptions. These exemptions include Religious, Good Cause, and Medical. A written statement is required for documentation. A physician must complete form for Medical Exemption.
  • Students will be excluded, but not excused, from school on the 15th day of school if State immunization mandates are not met.
  • During the course of an outbreak/or confirmed case of any of the aforementioned vaccines persons who are exempt from or who refuse the said vaccine will need to be excluded from school as directed by the Ohio Department of health. Exclusion maybe as long as 21 days.

Physical Education Excuse

  • Middle School/Upper School requires a physician letter of diagnosis, physical limitations, and duration of time excuse.
  • Lower School requires a parent note for class excuse unless it is a major injury.
  • A physician’s note to return to activities is required for any prolonged absence for all divisions ex: after a broken bone or severe sprain.

Special Health Needs (EpiPen, Inhaler, Diabetes, etc.)

If your child has specific health needs, please notify the school nurse so that individual accommodations, care plans, emergency action plans, or programs can be arranged. Please complete any needed forms in FinalForms.

Allergies requiring an EpiPen

  • Managing your child allergies is taken very seriously.
  • A written physician prescription authorization is required to have a prescribed EpiPen at school.
  • In Ohio a child is allowed to carry their own EpiPen with physician and parent written approval.
  • If your child will carry their own EpiPen it is also REQUIRED to have a second EpiPen in the Nurse’s Office.
  • If not you are required to keep two EpiPens in the Nurse’s Office.
  • This allows us to always have two EpiPens available for your child in case of an emergency.
  • If they are carrying it they will need to be responsible and take it to lunch, on field trips and after school activities.
  • The EpiPen needs to be in a convenient place easy to find for others if needed for an emergency. It should not be buried in the bottom of her book bag or locker.
  • Please obtain the needed written physician’s authorization and complete Serious Allergy Care Plan found in FinalForms.

Respiratory conditions requiring an inhaler

  • Managing asthma and respiratory conditions is also taken seriously.
  • A written physician prescription authorization is required to have a prescribed inhaler at school.
  • In Ohio a child is allowed to carry their own inhaler with physician and parent written approval.
  • If they will not carry it, an inhaler is required to be kept in the Nurse’s Office.
  • Should your child choose to carry their inhaler it needs to be in a convenient place easy to find for others, if needed, for an emergency. It should not be buried in the bottom of her book bag or locker.
  • Separate inhalers are needed for school use and athletic use. Inhalers will NOT be sent from the nurse's office to athletic events. The coach must have a separate inhaler.
  • Please obtain the needed written physician’s authorization and complete Asthma Management Care Plan found in FInalForms.

Diabetes management

  • Please contact the school nurse directly

An All-Girls’ Independent College Preparatory School for Grades K-12 and Coed Pre-Primary
Lyman Campus Butler Campus
216.464.1441


Laurel's Mission Statement:


To inspire each girl to
fulfill her promise and
to better the world. 

 

All-School Open House

Sunday, October 15, 2017
1:00-3:00 p.m.
Lyman and Butler Campuses

More information and RSVP here


"Laurel transforms students into strong women through an exemplary education and an atmosphere built on growth." Caitlin Cronin '16


"During my time at Laurel, I developed the mental aspect of my tennis game -- staying focused and staying in every match. The support that I've gotten from my team and my coaches has really helped me to do that." Danielle Buchinsky '15


"Laurel encourages its girls to try things they think they can do, things they don't think they can do, and even things they never thought about doing." Jazlynn Baker '16


"Laurel is a place where almost every girl can find a home. The community here is extremely accepting and diverse, and every student has her own ideas and opinions that are valued by everyone."Rebecca Brichacek '16


"Confident, independent, open-minded, fearless. That's what comes to mind when I think of what Laurel has given to my daughters." Laurel Parent

 

“The greatest gift Laurel gave me was the gift of lifelong friendships with classmates, teachers and parents of classmates. We have a special bond based on our shared experiences.” 
Betsy Sweeney Backes ‘78

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