All-School Calendar
  • May 2017
    • MonMay01 AP Exams
    • MonMay01 Dream Week
    • MonMay01 Senior Exam Week
    • TueMay02 AP Exams

Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz, a graduate of Yale, was recently interviewed by her friend and former classmate Ellen Gibson McGinnis for a Q&A in the March issue of YaleWomenIn the piece she talks about the role Yale played in her career (and how she first aspired to be an actress), the profound influence her early years of teaching in the housing project had on her, and her passion for educating girls, including teaching beyond academics and Laurel's Center for Research on Girls. When asked what her next challenge is, Ms. Klotz replied that she "wants to work on how best to teach our girls empathy. It gets back to diversity, and having a mix of voices in the room or 'at the table.' And it is so important for our society now." Click here to read the full interview.  

Outdoor Pre-Primary Teacher and Outdoor Education Specialist Audrey Elszasz and Abbie Bole, who teaches Kindergarten through Grade 4 science, are both included in a Cleveland Magazine article titled "The Benefits of Nature-based Learning", which looks at area early-childhood programs that use nature to help teach. Ms. Bole was quoted in the piece stating "The best way for children to learn is when they can see it, touch it, taste it, hear it, smell it. That's what makes an impression on their young minds." In the piece Mrs. Elszasz states, "We're answering questions with questions: 'What do you think?' Children interact with each other as they try to figure out the answers on their own." 

In addition to this feature story, Kathryn Marshall, Pre-Kindergarten Teacher at Laurel, is featured as the expert in this month's "Ask the Experts" section, which also focuses on how students benefit from receiving an outdoor education. Click here for the story.

In a March Motherwell Magazine piece Lisa Damour, Ph.D., Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls, participated in a Q&A on the topic of dress codes and girls, and the complexities of the cultural reaction to what girls wear. In the article Dr. Damour touches on the supposed benefits of a dress code versus the potential damage it might do to a girl's sense of control. She is quoted saying, "Many of the girls at Laurel School, where I work, use the word "love" to describe their attitude toward the school uniform. That said, many of the girls at Laurel had a hand in the choice to attend Laurel, so they knew what they were signing up for when they came. For students at schools that they did not choose, or schools that have no uniform but enforce a dress code, the situation is likely different, especially if the dress code is enforced in a mean-spirited way. But I would not assume that girls who follow a dress code necessarily feel that they are not in control of their bodies."

Click here to read the full interview. 

On the heels of their Scholastic Art Awards received earlier this year, Caroline Kahn '17 and Katie Dinner '17 each won the Herbert Ascherman Award for Photography, a regional award that is presented to two students each year. Caroline Kahn also received a Gold Key award for her photography and Katie Dinner received both a Silver Key and an honorable mention for her photography.

The Scholastic Arts & Writing Competition is an annual competition open to local students in Grades 7-12. The panel of judges is comprised of professional artists, art educators, writing and writing educators. More than 3,000 entries for both art and writing were submitted this year.

Congratulations to these students for this amazing honor.

On March 7, 2017 six Laurel students in Grades 9, 10 and 11 participated in the Northeastern Ohio Science & Engineering Fair (NEOSEF). Maryum Ali '18, Linnea Tyler '19, Katie Chen '20, and Katelyn Shakir '20 all earned 2nd place at the fair. Olivia Wenzel '20 received 3rd place. 

Grade 10 student Priya Khadilkhar earned an impressive 1st place in the regular judging and also walked away with four special awards: American Statistical Association, American Psychological Association, Cleveland Clinic Department of Psychiatry and Psychology and Cleveland State University Department of Psychology.

Many of the students are in Laurel's STEM Research class and while there was no specific topic focus at the event, each of the students chose their own category and had about two months to put their presentations together. Congratulations to all the girls on these incredible achievements!

  

 

Crain's Cleveland Business publisher and editor Elizabeth McIntyre recently attended a panel discussion hosted by Laurel's Entrepreneurship Capstone Students on the documentary film, "Dream, Girl" - a celebration of female entrepreneurs. She highlights that "the young women at Laurel know the power of female leadership because it's front and center in the school's mission to inspire girls to fulfill their promise and better the world. To be living, breathing 'Fearless Girls.'" She goes on to state that Laurel's mission is "what prompted the school to launch its Capstone Experience program last year, which gives students the chance to explore real-world issues while further developing their leadership skills in one of four areas: civic engagement, entrepreneurship, global studies and STEAM (a twist on STEM, "science, technology, engineering and mathematics", that adds "arts" to the mix.)"

Panelists at the event included Heather Ettinger '79, managing partner at Fairport Asset Management; Stephanie Silverman, publisher and owner of Your Teen Media; Nichelle McCall '01, CEO of Bold Startups; and Laura Bennett, COO and co-founder of Embrace Pet Insurance, each of whom shared their experiences in creating and running their own businesses. 

The editor goes on to highlight many of the inspiring messages shared during the panel discussion. "Persistence is one of the most valuable things," and "shatter stereotypes whenever you can," were just a few.

Click here to read the full story in Crain's Cleveland Business

Kathryn Purcell, Associate Head of School and Director of Enrollment Management at Laurel was recently featured in a Cleveland Jewish News story highlighting the importance of school culture and how it plays a crucial role in school selection.

Many factors can determine which school a child attends. Class size, programs, location and extracurricular activities can impact a parent's willingness to send a child to a particular school. But, parents should also consider a more abstract notion that exists within a school. School culture focuses on how staff members interact and uphold a shared set of values and beliefs and the school’s effect on students – like teaching practices, diversity and relationships within the school. When it comes to school choice, local educators say school culture should impact their choices as well. 

Kathryn is quoted saying, “(A school’s culture) allows a child to feel visible. You don’t want anyone to fall through the cracks,” Purcell said. “The sense of community kind of dictates how valuable a child feels at a school.”

She goes on to say that even though culture is an intangible factor when choosing a school, it’s just as crucial as anything else. A school’s culture encompasses not only the how the school feels, but also how it interacts with itself. These interactions should be a big part of deciding which school is the right fit.

Click here to read the full story.

Congratulations to the Laurel girls from Grades 5 and 6 who competed in the Greater Cleveland Council of Teachers of Mathematics (GCCTM) math competition on February 18, 2017! Laurel sent three teams of four this year--two from Grade 5 and one from Grade 6--and all received Blue Champion ribbons. The competition included 18 Fifth Grade teams and seven Sixth Grade teams. Similarly, teams from Laurel's Seventh and Eighth Grades competed on March 5 where they received the Champion Award and Medal Award respectively. 

The competition was comprised of four events, each roughly 15 minutes in length. Teams were tasked with working together to problem solve and work through mental math, construction and mixed application problems. Laurel students have been preparing since December to compete and their performance did not disappoint! 

Congratulations to all of the girls on their hard earned achievements!

 

Laurel School's eleventh annual Gator Bash took place on Saturday, February 11 at the Hilton Cleveland Downtown. The theme of the evening was "For the Love of Laurel" and it was clear the more than 500 attendees hold the school close to their hearts. The evening raised a total of $215,000 with $107,000 of that raised during the Call to the Heart paddle raise to support Laurel's new Innovation Fund. This fund will align with the School's new five-year Strategic Roadmap and provide some of the necessary resources to fund innovative education happening throughout Laurel. Highlights from this spectacular evening were included in the Cleveland Jewish NewsCurrents MagazineCleveland Magazine and Cleveland.com

Featured in the photo above is Dan Angelino and Beth Embrescia, Chair of the Laurel Board of Trustees.

Summer at Laurel was recently highlighted in a roundup piece in Cleveland Magazine titled "Summer Camp Guide: Get Out and About." The story included feedback from Summer at Laurel Director Dr. Karen Edwards, who discusses a partnership with the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA), which opens doors for students to explore drawing, painting, sculpting and printing. CMA and Summer at Laurel will also offer a printmaking camp, where students in Grades 8-12 spend a half-day working with teachers at the museum and the other half at Laurel's Lyman Campus. Dr. Edwards is quoted in the story saying, "The key is to find something that meets your child's interests or passions, and also challenges them."

Click here for the full story. 

  • May 2017
    • MonMay01 AP Exams
    • MonMay01 Dream Week
    • MonMay01 Senior Exam Week
    • TueMay02 AP Exams
    • TueMay02 Senior Exam Week
    • TueMay02 Primary Parents "Looking Ahead" 6:30 PM
    • WedMay03 AP Exams
    • WedMay03 Senior Exam Week
    • WedMay03 MS Parents "Looking Ahead" 6:30 PM
    • ThuMay04 AP Exams
    • ThuMay04 Senior Exam Week
    • FriMay05 AP Exams
    • FriMay05 Cinco de Mayo
    • FriMay05 Senior Exam Week

Capstone Experience

Mission of Capstone

Laurel School’s Capstone Experience, by design, will cultivate purpose, relationships and leadership using one of four lenses— Civic Engagement, Entrepreneurship, Global Studies, STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics). Capstone Candidates will explore issues through guided research, intellectual discussion, relevant internships and purposeful travel. Using expert guidance from mentors and support from cohort peers, each Capstone Candidate will create a Research Focus based on her individual interests and agency. This innovative program provides committed, interested students with opportunities to approach real-world issues with interdisciplinary, experiential and community-based strategies while building mentor and peer relationships. In developing a sense of purpose, meaningful mentor and peer relationships, and skills of leadership, Capstone prepares a Laurel girl “to fulfill her promise and to better the world.”

The Four Capstone Categories

Civic Engagement
Through an interdisciplinary, experiential and community-based approach, Candidates in the Civic Engagement program will explore what it means to be an engaged citizen working to improve her community, her state, her nation and her world.

Entrepreneurship
Through an interdisciplinary, experiential and community-based approach, Candidates in the Entrepreneurship category will experience the start of a new business initiative, the building and execution of an idea from the ground up and the risk of failure.

Global Studies
Through an interdisciplinary, experiential and community-based approach, Candidates in the Global Studies category will explore global issues by identifying and analyzing a multitude of perspectives, including one’s own and those of others.

STEAM
Through an interdisciplinary, experiential and communitybased approach, Candidates in the STEAM category will explore many intersections of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics in order to understand and to apply multi-disciplinary strategies to an endeavor.

Capstone Requirements Timeline

Ninth Grade

  • January of Ninth Grade: Complete the Capstone application.
  • February/March of Ninth Grade: Selections of Capstone Candidates announced
  • March of Ninth Grade: Each cohort begins to meet bi-weekly for student-led discussions.
  • MayTerm of Ninth Grade: Cohort activities focusing on leadership skill development and peer bonding at Laurel’s Butler Campus and in Cleveland.

Tenth Grade

  • First Semester of Tenth Grade: Bi-weekly, student-led discussions in each cohort; planning for March cohort trips.
  • December of Tenth Grade: Students may exit or enter the program depending on what is best for individual students.
  • Second Semester of Tenth Grade: Bi-weekly, student-led discussions in each cohort; planning for March cohort trips. 
  • March of Tenth Grade: Student-planned cohort trips: Civic Engagement to Washington, D.C.; Entrepreneurship to San Francisco; Global Studies to New York City; STEAM to Chicago.
  • April of Tenth Grade: Using the lens of her Capstone category, each Candidate designs a Research Focus and is assigned a Capstone mentor.
  • MayTerm of Tenth Grade: Relevant Protégé Internship Project for each Candidate.

Eleventh Grade

  • Eleventh Grade Year: Each Candidate, guided by her mentor, works on her Research Focus; bi-weekly cohort meetings continue and serve as peer-review sessions for progress of each Research Focus.
  • Winter of Eleventh Grade: Each cohort works with a younger grade in the Middle or Primary Schools at Laurel in order to share knowledge and experience gained in Capstone. 
  • MayTerm of Eleventh Grade: Relevant Protégé Internship Project for each Candidate.
  • Summer of Eleventh Grade: Each Candidate works to complete a draft of her completed Research Focus (a paper or project).

Twelfth Grade

  • Fall of Twelfth Grade: No work on Capstone as the focus is on the college process—though a student’s Capstone Experience certainly could serve to highlight college applications.
  • January through March of Twelfth Grade: Candidates complete final draft of their Research Focus.
  • April and May of Twelfth Grade: Candidates make oral defense of Research Focus to mentor and Capstone committee.
  • Graduation: Capstone Candidates receive special designation at graduation, becoming Capstone Scholars.

Capstone Glossary

Capstone Candidate: a participant in Capstone
Capstone Scholar: a designation for completing Capstone received at graduation
Cohort: a small group of grade-level students in a particular Capstone category
Research Focus: a research-based paper or equivalent project designed by each Candidate with guidance from her mentor

Common Questions About Capstone

Click a question to reveal its answer.

What is the goal of Laurel School’s Capstone Experience?

While knowledge, research, and a level of expertise in one of the categories certainly will happen for a student, the goal of Laurel School’s Capstone Experience is to provide a greater sense of purpose as well as to develop skills of leadership, collaboration and relationship—qualities Laurel believes will serve a student for a lifetime in any endeavor.

Will it cost anything?

Yes. To participate in Capstone, a student’s family will pay $500 per year, which includes all components of the experience, including the trips.

Will financial aid be available?

Yes, for families who are eligible for financial aid from Laurel School.

Will it be graded?

No. A student will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis; grades will not be assigned.

Will all Upper School students be able to participate in Capstone?

No. Each cohort will accept a limited number of students.

Does a student need to have previously developed interests or experience in a Capstone category to be a good applicant?

No. While some students may have relevant prior experiences or interests, Capstone wants students who are curious and passionate about collaboratively exploring topics in experiential and interdisciplinary ways.

Will a student’s academic record be the only component of the admissions process?

No. The Capstone application process strives to identify students who want to develop leadership skills, relationship and collaboration skills, and some level of knowledge and expertise in a particular lens.

Will Capstone prevent a student from taking particular classes or from participating in sports or extracurricular activities?

No. Capstone will be scheduled to avoid as many academic and athletic/extracurricular commitments as possible.

Will Capstone prevent a student from participating in Laurel School’s Passport trips?

No. Many trip offerings certainly would serve the objectives of the Capstone program. While the Capstone cohort trips in the Tenth Grade will be covered by cost of the Capstone Experience, Passport trips offered through Laurel will not be covered by the $500 per year Capstone price.

Further questions about Laurel’s Capstone Experience?

Contact Trey Wilson, Director of Strategic Partnerships
tWilson@LaurelSchool.org or 216-455-3019

An All-Girls’ Independent College Preparatory School for Grades K-12 and Coed Pre-Primary
Lyman Campus Butler Campus
216.464.1441


Laurel's Mission Statement:


To inspire each girl to
fulfill her promise and
to better the world. 

 

All-School Open House

October 2017
exact date and time coming soon
Lyman Campus


"Laurel transforms students into strong women through an exemplary education and an atmosphere built on growth." Caitlin Cronin '16


"During my time at Laurel, I developed the mental aspect of my tennis game -- staying focused and staying in every match. The support that I've gotten from my team and my coaches has really helped me to do that." Danielle Buchinsky '15


"Laurel encourages its girls to try things they think they can do, things they don't think they can do, and even things they never thought about doing." Jazlynn Baker '16


"Laurel is a place where almost every girl can find a home. The community here is extremely accepting and diverse, and every student has her own ideas and opinions that are valued by everyone."Rebecca Brichacek '16


"Confident, independent, open-minded, fearless. That's what comes to mind when I think of what Laurel has given to my daughters." Laurel Parent

 

“The greatest gift Laurel gave me was the gift of lifelong friendships with classmates, teachers and parents of classmates. We have a special bond based on our shared experiences.” 
Betsy Sweeney Backes ‘78

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