Congratulations to the Grade Five, Six and Seven girls who competed in the Greater Cleveland Council of Teachers of Mathematics (GCCTM) math competition at John Carroll University and at Hawken School this year. The tournament recognizes interest and perseverance in math outside the classroom, encouraging students to challenge their problem-solving skills in a competitive team format.

Of the three trophies available Laurel teams took all three! Congratulations to all the girls for their hard work and positive outcomes.  

5th Grade: (Trophy)
  • Clare H.
  • Sydney M.
  • Jazmin R.
  • Ella W.
5th Grade: (Trophy)
  • Gianna M.
  • Katie I.
  • Eve B.
  • Kelly K.
6th Grade: (Trophy)
  • Kaitlin E.
  • Amelia G.
  • Lexi C.
  • Karma A. 
6th Grade: (Blue Ribbon)
  • Riley O.
  • Grace G.
  • Kate T.
  • Shaliz B.
Grade Seven: (Red Ribbon)
  • Krista C.
  • Veda P.
  • Maria P.

Congratulations to Celeste Bohan '19, Emi Cummings '20, Janaan Qutubuddin '20, and Daania Tahir '19, whose award-winning art and writing won accolades in this year's regional Scholastic Art & Writing Competition, and went on to receive Silver Keys in the National Competition. This year, students submitted more than 330,000 works of visual art and writing to the Scholastic Awards; more than 90,000 works were recognized at the regional level and celebrated in local exhibitions and ceremonies. The top art and writing at the regional level were moved onto the national stage, where more than 2,700 works earned National Medals. Congratulations to our students on their amazing achievements. The girls will be celebrated at the National Ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

The names of the winning art and writing follow below.

  • Celeste Bohan "Reflections" photo
  • Emi Cummings "Growing up with Purseblog" personal essay/memoir
  • Janaan Qutubuddin "My Missing" poetry
  • Daania Tahir "Letter to America" personal essay/memoir

In her latest New York Times Well Adolescence columnLisa Damour, Ph.D., Executive Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls, hones in on why demonstrating is good for kids. A new research report published in January in the journal Child Development, found that late adolescents and young adults who voted, volunteered or engaged in activism ultimately went further in school and had higher incomes than those who did not mobilize for political or social change. The study found that civic activity linked to better academic and financial outcomes regardless of early school performance and parental education levels, two factors that usually drive later success. In the article Lisa states that "The research is especially timely as American students consider whether to participate in the National School Walkout planned for Wednesday, March 14."

She goes on to say that "Taking part in a single event may not, by itself, alter the trajectory of an adolescent's development. But the study's authors suggest that positive, lasting outcomes may result if organized civic engagement helps young people galvanize their belief in their personal efficacy, connect to empowering social networks or cultivate professional skills."

Lisa also appeared on CBS Morning News to discuss the same topic. Click here to view her interview.

Laurel Primary science teacher Abbie Bole and her science class was recently featured on Channel 5 for their STEAM work through an innovative program called Level Up Village. The program allows Laurel students to work with student partners in another country to together, design a solution to a global problem. This year Laurel girls are working with partners in Zimbabwe to develop a light box using Tinkercad software and a 3D printer that can provide electricity to those without access. Channel 5 saw the students in action recording videos to communicate with their partners and using tinkering software to design their light boxes. The class also practiced printing their designs on two 3D printers. Click here to watch the full story.
In her February New York Times Well Adolescence columnLisa Damour, Ph.D., Executive Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls, addresses how to approach the topic of vaping with teenagers. In her column, Lisa suggests “Instead of leading with facts, consider starting with genuine curiosity. Setting judgement to the side, ask, ‘What’s your take on e-cigarettes?’ or ‘Do you know kids who are vaping?’ or something along those lines.” Lisa states that “asking teenagers what they know about any topic increases the odds that they’ll want to hear what we now about that topic, too.” Lisa goes on to suggest that when talking to teens about vaping, you ask why before suggesting why not. Share your concerns and finally, concede the limits of your power. “Articulate high expectations in one breath and acknowledge the limits of power in the next.”

Lisa was also recently featured on CBS News to discuss the perceived link between gun violence and mental illness.

Laurel's Headmistress, Ann V. Klotz, had the opportunity to sit down with Sue Reid from Currents magazine in January to share the story of how she came to Laurel and her vision for the school and its students. "At Laurel, Ms. Klotz, the School's 10th head of school, is her 'authentic self,' she described, and proudly commits to cultivating leadership in women on a daily basis." The story goes on to highlight Ann's time spent as a student at the all-girls Agnes Irwin School in Rosemont, PA and then onto Yale University and later, New York University. She also highlights her early career in different positions at Chapin School, an all-girls independent day school in Manhattan, where she worked as an English teacher, head of the drama department and director of guidance. It was there that her now late mentor Mildred Berendsen urged her to consider working as a head of school. It was that guidance that ultimately led her to Laurel.

"Her charge at the time of hire, she explained, was to get an academic vision for the school's Butler Campus as well as increase Laurel's attention to social and emotional development of girls in addition to academics. To that end, Ms. Klotz worked to found Laurel's Center for Research on Girls, which now serves as a national model."

The article goes on to highlight Ann's passion for theater, her love for teaching and her typical day. Under Ann's leadership, "Laurel is a place where girls practice developing confidence, their voice, smarts, respect and empathy and understand how to value multiple points of view."

Click here to read the full article.

The Cleveland Jewish News recently spoke to Daniel McGee, Director of Technology and Library Services at Laurel School, to discuss how technology is evolving and being used in the classroom. As the world becomes more digital-oriented, schools are finding ways to integrate technology into the classroom and Laurel is no exception. Daniel is quoted in the article saying "because technology is ever-changing, education is developing along with it. Tech is changing the world and that is something we have to be on top of here to serve our students,” he said. “Technology is embedded in the classroom and the students need the skills to function in a world that we can’t even imagine yet. We don’t know what life will be like. These are foundational skills that will help them be creative and communicate with whoever they encounter.”

Though some people view technology as an “extra” in the classroom, Daniel commented that it’s an old-school view of learning. “Kids don’t see it as something extra or separate, their lives are full of tech and bringing it into the classroom ties it to real life,” he said. “It’s impacting in ways you wouldn’t see. It’s everywhere. For example, we have a few programs where first graders do blogging that develops their writing skills, but also puts their words to a larger audience. They’re learning to share with the world in a safe way.”

Click here to read the full article.

Laurel School, as part of a national initiative by Fair Trade Campaigns to engage K – 12 students in issues of global poverty, is proud to announce its official designation as a Fair Trade School. Fair Trade is an economic system that ensures consumers the products they buy were grown, harvested, crafted and traded in ways that improve lives and protect the environment. Fair Trade Campaigns officially recognizes schools in the U.S. committed to educating students about the issues of Fair Trade and sourcing Fair Trade products like coffee, tea and bananas in the cafeteria, offices and at events.

Started by Margaret O’Neill '19, Laurel Fair Trade hopes to educate the Laurel Community about the various social injustices many under-developed countries face on a daily basis. Helping to learn and support Fair Trade will shine a light on the need for a safer, more just work environment leading to a more sustainable way of life. We hope to use funds that we earn towards investing in organizations and or individuals who aspire to better themselves and the world.

Laurel is the 31st Fair Trade School in the U.S., and the 7th in the state of Ohio to earn this designation. highlighted the recent work of more than 100 Laurel students and community members who participated in the school's 8th Annual Martin Luther King Day of Service. In all, volunteers made 16 tie blankets and more than 145 toiletry-stuffed socks, which will be donated to the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless. In addition, volunteers assembled Hope Tote Bags for The City Mission. Click here to view the story.

Thanks to all who came out for this important day of service.

Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz was recently published in the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) blog where she highlights 14 of her top interview etiquette tips. She starts the blog by stating that "January is the time when I, head of Laurel School (OH), feel like Janus, the Roman god of beginnings and transitions. With one face, I focus intently on the remaining six months of the current school year. With the other, my thoughts turn to the complex jigsaw that is staffing." As the school year marches on Ann and her team "Calculate enrollment and next year’s number of sections. We think about who might be ready for a change, and what new staff and faculty we might have the opportunity to bring into our school. Hiring is an exhilarating and exhausting undertaking."

Her interview etiquette tips range from the seemingly simple task of ensuring you submit a resume and cover letter without errors to arriving to an interview early because "If you’re not five minutes early, you’re late." Among other tips, Ann also highlights how being curious and asking lots of questions can set you apart.

To read all her interview etiquette tips click here.

Faculty & Staff Directory

Faculty and Staff Directory


New Faculty and Staff for 2017-2018

Large image

Taylor Kaar

Faculty Information
Department(s) Upper School
Title(s) Science Teacher, Upper School, Capstone Cohort Coordinator, Veale Entrepreneurship Coordinator
Contact Information
School Email
School Phone
216-464-2205 x1246
Degree(s) B.S., Case Western Reserve University
M.A, Baldwin Wallace College
Other Information

An All-Girls’ Independent College Preparatory School for Grades K-12 and Coed Pre-Primary
Lyman Campus Butler Campus

Laurel's Mission Statement:

To inspire each girl to
fulfill her promise and
to better the world. 


Middle and Upper School
Open House

Saturday, April 21, 2018
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Lyman Campus

More information and RSVP here


"Laurel transforms students into strong women through an exemplary education and an atmosphere built on growth." Caitlin Cronin '16

"During my time at Laurel, I developed the mental aspect of my tennis game -- staying focused and staying in every match. The support that I've gotten from my team and my coaches has really helped me to do that." Danielle Buchinsky '15

"Laurel encourages its girls to try things they think they can do, things they don't think they can do, and even things they never thought about doing." Jazlynn Baker '16

"Laurel is a place where almost every girl can find a home. The community here is extremely accepting and diverse, and every student has her own ideas and opinions that are valued by everyone."Rebecca Brichacek '16

"Confident, independent, open-minded, fearless. That's what comes to mind when I think of what Laurel has given to my daughters." Laurel Parent


“The greatest gift Laurel gave me was the gift of lifelong friendships with classmates, teachers and parents of classmates. We have a special bond based on our shared experiences.” 
Betsy Sweeney Backes ‘78

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