All-School Calendar
  • November 2018
    • WedNov21 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • ThuNov22 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • FriNov23 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • SatNov24 Middle School Homework-Free Weekend
On October 10, several members of the Laurel community, including 12 alumnae, spent the afternoon with students in Grades K-8 leading activities focused on financial literacy and entrepreneurship. The goal was to empower and spark entrepreneurial spirit in the students. Activities were designed by VentureLab and incorporated using the girls' resourcefulness, problem-solving skills and curiosity. Many of the activities focused on idea generation, creating a business model, design thinking and pitching. The Sun Press and Sun Messenger included a recap of this fun and engaging afternoon on their front pages.

Maggie Hilkert '19 was featured in Currents Magazine highlighting her love for finance, which she discovered through her participation in Laurel's Capstone Experience. In her Sophomore year, Maggie traveled to San Francisco and after meeting a Laurel alumna who is a venture capitalist, stated that, "She had the coolest job I ever saw. I loved talking to her. I was fascinated with her job and that helped me narrow that aspect of my project." As Maggie progressed with her Capstone Experience, she "interviewed venture capitalists around the country, shadowed Cleveland-area business owners, interned at an equity research firm, and decided to start an Investment Committee at Laurel." The article goes on to say that, "Earlier this month, Maggie moderated a panel of women in finance as part of Laurel's Day of the Girl celebration which, this year, had a theme of financial literacy." 

Click here to read the full story.

The Cleveland Jewish News has named Jami Morris '21 as its Player of the Week. Jami earned the honors after finishing in a tie for first place at the Ohio High School Athletic Association Division II state girls golf tournament October 12-13 at The Ohio State University Golf Club’s Gray Course in Columbus. She shot a 73-74 for a total of 147, plus-7, tying for lowest score. In the article, Jami said she wasn’t surprised she performed so well in the tournament. "I think I worked extremely hard this past summer. I feel that all paid off and I hope to continue next year, and the year after, and hopefully in college. Except on the first day, I didn’t even think I was playing in the state tournament. Walking off the 18th green, I thought, 'I’m happy with how I played, I could have played better, but there’s always next year.'" 

Laurel golf coach Marti Hardy said she was impressed with Morris’s performance, but she wasn’t surprised. "I’ve watched her all along work hard to get where she has. I think the harder thing is, when you play at states, you’re not necessarily playing with the players that are scoring what you’ve been scoring the last day or so. It’s an unknown, they’re out there somewhere on the course playing. Maybe it’s a good thing that you don’t know, but I watched Jami just keep it all together really well and not doubt herself. I saw her hit two phenomenal shots that two golf pros who were near me said, 'she’s the real deal, she really knows how to play this game,' and it’s true."

Click here to read the full story.

 

 

Congratulations to these seven members of Laurel's class of 2019 who have received Letters of Commendation in recognition of their outstanding academic promise, based on their Preliminary Scholastic Achievement Test scores. More than 1.6 million juniors took the PSAT in 2017. Catherine Amaddio, Grace Cousens, Ria Desai, Meredith Hilkert, Cameron Kaye, Simran Surtani, and Daania Tahir all scored in the top 50,000 of those participants.

Early childhood education is just as rewarding for educators as it is for students. This was the theme in a recent Cleveland Jewish News article that featured interview excerpts from Laurel Prekindergarten teacher Kathryn Marshall. In the story Kathryn states that, "Children keep me in the moment and help me rediscover the joy of being in the moment. I get to have the same awe with children right there with them." She goes on to explain that she is "Always trying to find new, innovative ways to teach children. The sense of joy and wonder of living in the moment also translates into my life." Click here to read the full story, including the sage advice Kathryn would give her younger self.
Jami Morris '21, who competed in the Drive, Chip & Putt National Finals in Augusta earlier this year, recently conducted a Q&A with Cleveland Magazine where she talked golf, fashion, the perfect miniature golf hole design and her hobbies off the golf course. Her story was featured in the magazine's Private School Special Section. When asked what her favorite golf attire is she replied "I have these crazy bright pink shorts. If I had 20 pairs, I would wear them every day. They brighten my game and encourage me to be the best golfer I can be." She also touched on equality in her interview, stating that "Women should be able to play with the men, on the same courses and with the same yardages. That would be a big step up for women's golf, and we will rise to the challenge." 

Click here to read her full interview.  

Jackson to work together with Ann V. Klotz and Board members to maintain the Laurel School Mission

SHAKER HEIGHTS, OH – (August 22, 2018) Laurel School is pleased to announce Lynnette Jackson ’93 as the new Chair of the Board of Trustees. Jackson, a Relationship Manager and Vice President at Key Private Bank, has been on the Board since 2012, most recently serving as Vice Chair. Prior to joining the Board of Trustees, Jackson held the role of Laurel Alumnae Board President from 2009-2012.

“It is both an honor and a privilege to serve in this role as Board Chair,” said Lynnette Jackson. “It is an opportunity to give back to my alma mater who, through academic rigor, enriching experiences and leadership opportunities, has inspired me and my family to dream, dare and do. As Laurel embarks on its 125th Birthday, the work of this Board will certainly shape the next 25-50 years of the school.”

In her Relationship Manager role at Key Private Bank, Jackson delivers integrated strategies and forward-thinking, objective advice to her clients. These skills will continue to serve her well in her new role as Board Chair where Jackson will work closely with Laurel Headmistress Ann V. Klotz and other Board members to continue to set and maintain a vision and strategy for the school. Together, they will ensure sound financial management, appropriate stewardship of resources, and accountability towards goals.

“I am so pleased to be working hand-in-hand with Lynnette and the entire Board of Trustees to continue living Laurel’s mission and building on our long-term vision,” said Ann V. Klotz, Laurel Headmistress. “The Board has been instrumental in the development of our Strategic Roadmap and it is an exciting time for us as we embark on our next goal. I look forward to seeing what we can accomplish together.”

Other updates to the Board include Kristine Swails Bryan ’80, who has been named Vice Chair. Bryan is an Equity Research Consultant with Private Harbour Investment Management, LLC, and has been a member of the Board since 2015, most recently serving as Chair of the Investment Committee. Megan Lum Mehalko ’83, Chaundra King Monday ’95, and Suzanne Schulze Taylor ’81, have all been newly elected to the Board with three-year terms commencing June 2018.

###

Founded in 1896, Laurel School is a nationally recognized school for girls in Kindergarten through Grade 12, with a coeducational Pre-Primary School. Its mission is “to inspire each girl to fulfill her promise and to better the world.”

CONTACT:    

SARAH MILLER, PR MANAGER, 713.578.0281, sMiller@LaurelSchool.org

KATE FLOYD, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING, 216.455.0152, kFloyd@LaurelSchool.org

Laurel's After School Coordinator, Tina Ohmart, was recently included in a Cleveland Jewish News article highlighting the importance of after-school programming and its benefits to kids. In the story she states that, "We have students who stay after school for supervised play and they hang out with their friends and develop emotional and social skills. And then there are structured activities where students can learn something specific as well. But across the board, there are social-emotional skills that can be learned. Everything else is a plus.”

She also highlights how after-school programming can be a great avenue for personal growth. Click here to read the full story.

According to the Cleveland Jewish News, "Advancements in technology have made their way into the classroom and influence the way students learn."

Daniel McGee, Laurel's director of technology and library services, was recently interviewed for a piece focused on technology in the classroom and how its use affects how students learn. In the story Daniel agreed that technology’s influence is largely for the better. "Technology is kind of boundless, it has no boundaries, so it can be used for any discipline. It allows you to do something transformative and it allows you to find ways to express yourself in unique ways that you wouldn’t be able to do without using those tools."

Daniel also touched on Laurel's one-to-one laptop program where a laptop is provided to each student and the use of G Suite so students and teachers can utilize Google apps, such as Docs, Sheets and Classroom to engage with the learning material. 3D printers are also incorporated into the curriculum at Laurel.

Click here to read the full story.

Laurel's Capstone Experience was recently featured in Currents Magazine. Capstone, a three-and-a-half-year program that promotes research, mentorship, peer collaboration and relationships, internships, leadership and peer travel, had 86 Upper School students participate during the 2017/2018 school year. What makes the Capstone Experience unique is its focus on students' drive and interest in participating in something extracurricular versus their transcripts. If accepted, girls participate in group projects and collaborative seminars through the end of Grade Ten and then go on to choose an area of inquiry that falls under one of four lenses: Civic Engagement, Entrepreneurship, Global Studies, or STEAM. 

The Currents piece highlights Morgan Goldstein '18 who, as part of her Capstone Experience, authored a cookbook where adolescents are the intended audience. Morgan worked closely with her project mentor Steve Trattner, who has worked with many notable chefs on their own cookbooks, to make her dream become a reality. The article highlights another former Capstone student, Maddy Massey '18, who chose the STEAM lens for her research and comprised a seven-song album. To achieve this, Maddy worked with her mentor, local singer/songwriter Jennifer Chittester, who played at LaureLive in 2016. 

Trey Wilson, Laurel's Director of Strategic Partnerships, was interviewed for this story. Click here to read the full piece.

  • November 2018
    • WedNov21 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • ThuNov22 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • FriNov23 Thanksgiving Holiday: NO CLASSES - BUILDING CLOSED
    • SatNov24 Middle School Homework-Free Weekend
    • WedNov28 Junior Chapel and Reception (US Formal Uniform) 10:25 AM to 11:25 AMLyman: Tippit Gymnasium
  • December 2018
    • SunDec02 Hanukkah Begins at Sundown
    • TueDec04 Protege Dinner 5:30 PM to 7:30 PMLyman
    • ThuDec06 Primary Winter Celebration 1:30 PMLyman
    • FriDec07 Primary Winter Celebration 9:00 AMLyman
    • FriDec07 Grades 7 & 8 CCIS Social 6:00 PM to 8:00 PMHawken Lower School
    • MonDec10 Hanukkah Ends
    • TueDec11 Music Academy Recitals (4:00, 5:30 & 6:30) 4:00 PM to 7:30 PMLyman
    • ThuDec13 Middle School Music Celebration 7:00 PMLyman

Leadership & Advisory Panel

Ann V. Klotz ~ Founder

Head of School
Laurel School

Ann V. Klotz began her tenure as Laurel’s tenth Head of School on July 1, 2004. Committed to academic excellence, Klotz is equally devoted to the social and emotional development of girls and enthusiastically champions Laurel’s legacy as a school that fosters confidence, creativity, critical thinking and compassion in its students.

As a graduate of The Agnes Irwin School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, Klotz experienced first-hand the opportunities afforded girls who are educated in an environment dedicated to their particular strengths and needs. A cum laude graduate of Yale, she obtained her Master of Arts degree from New York University where she majored in Individual Study of Drama.

Prior to her arrival at Laurel, Klotz spent twenty years as an educator and administrator at The Chapin School in New York City. She served as Director of College Guidance and as a member of Chapin’s administrative team, while maintaining ongoing roles as head of the Drama Department, coordinator of the Fine Arts Department and teacher of Upper School English. Klotz continues to help lead the highly successful summer program for high schools students she and her husband, Seth Orbach, established in Pennsylvania - the Ensemble Theatre Community School.

Klotz is a graduate of Leadership Cleveland and serves on the boards of the Heads’ Network, the National Coalition of Girls Schools, Lawrence School, and Headmistresses of the East. Deeply committed to mentoring women to independent school leadership, she has served on the faculty for the NAIS Institute for Aspiring School Heads and the Heads’ Network Leadership Seminar. Ms. Klotz has blogged for the Huffington Post—frequently on topics around the intersection of motherhood and school leadership. Additionally, her work has appeared in Independent School Magazine, Community Works Institute Journal, and the NAIS Independent Ideas Blog.

Contact Ann at aKlotz@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-455-3000

Lisa Damour, Ph.D. ~ Executive Director

Department of Psychology
Case Western Reserve University

Consulting Psychologist
Laurel School

Lisa Damour, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls, writes the monthly Adolescence column for the Well Family section of the New York Times, and is a regular contributor at CBS News. She serves as a Senior Advisor to the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Damour maintains a private psychotherapy practice and also consults and speaks internationally. She is the author of numerous academic papers, chapters, and books related to education and child development. Her New York Times best selling book, Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, was released by Random House in February 2016. Untangled has been hailed by Dr. Michael Thompson as "the best description of the female adolescent journey that I have ever read" and by Dr. Madeline Levine as "mandatory reading."

Dr. Damour graduated with honors from Yale University and then worked for the Yale Child Study Center before earning her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Michigan. She has held fellowships from Yale’s Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy and from the University of Michigan’s Power Foundation.

Contact Lisa at 216-455-3061

Tori Cordiano, Ph.D. ~ Director of Research

Department of Psychology
John Carroll University

Consulting Psychologist
Laurel School

Tori Cordiano, Ph.D. is the Director of Research of Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls. She is dedicated to the practical application of empirical research on girls' learning and development and to thinking about new avenues for exploring how girls grow.

Dr. Cordiano graduated with honors from Case Western Reserve University where she also received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology. She was the recipient of the Brisky Fellowship for her research in the area of children's pretend play and creativity.

Dr. Cordiano is the co-author of several book chapters and research papers related to pretend play, play assessment, children's creativity, and parenting interventions. She teaches in the master's counseling program at John Carroll University and in the doctoral physical therapy program at Cleveland State University. Dr. Cordiano maintains a private practice, where she specializes in psychotherapy and assessment with children, adolescents, and families.

Contact Tori at tCordiano@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-751-5442

Sarah Wilson ~ Director

Director of the Upper School
Laurel School

Contact Sarah at sWilson@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-455-3022

Eileen P. Anderson-Fye, Ed.D

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
Case Western Reserve University


Eileen P. Anderson-Fye, Ed.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Case Western Reserve University whose research centers around the well-being of adolescents in contexts of socio-cultural change.  She studies how adolescents - already going through normative developmental changes - make sense of changing contexts around them in ways that both help and hinder their well-being, and particularly mental health.  Dr. Anderson-Fye's work aims to identify and explain processes by which adolescents engage in pathways to well-being or distress with the ultimate aim of interventions in practice and policy to increase adolescent well-being and reduce distress. 

Dr. Anderson-Fye's work has appeared in a variety of scholarly publications including the "Harvard Educational Review," "Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry," "ETHOS," "The International Encyclopedia of Adolescence," and "The Handbook of Eating Disorders and Obesity."


Anne Curzan, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of English
University of Michigan

Professor Anne Curzan is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Michigan. She also has a faculty appointment in the School of Education. Professor Curzan's research interests include the history of English, language and gender, corpus linguistics, medieval language and literature, historical sociolinguistics, pedagogy, and lexicography. In addition to her teaching, research, and administrative posts in the English Department, Professor Curzan is co-editor of the Journal of English Linguistics.
Professor Curzan's published work includes:
How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction. 2006. 
With Michael Adams. New York: Pearson/Longman.
Gender Shifts in the History of English. 2003. 
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
First Day to Final Grade: A Graduate Student’s Guide to Teaching. 2nd Ed. 2006. With Lisa Damour. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Studies in the History of the English Language II: Unfolding Conversations. 2004. Ed. with Kimberly Emmons. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Numerous articles and book reviews.

JoAnn Deak, Ph.D.

Principal, The Deak Group

JoAnn Deak, Ph.D., has spent more than twenty years as an educator and psychologist, helping children develop into confident and competent adults. The latter half of that period has focused on working with parents and teachers in their roles as guides for children. On her website is a quote that best describes her perspective on her work: "Every interaction a child has, during the course of a day, influences the adult that child will become." 

Parents and educators from schools in the United States and abroad, as well as organizations such as the National Association of Independent Schools, International Schools Association of Africa, etc., have heralded Dr. Deak's ability to demystify complex issues of child development, learning, identify formation and brain research. Mary Pipher, author of Reviving Ophelia and The Shelter of Each Other has called Dr. Deak "an earnest idealist and a 
rigorous researcher... a good combination of head and heart." Michael Thompson, author of Raising Cain and Best Friends, Worst Enemies, has said that her writing "offers parents humor, understanding, parenting philosophy, and well founded words of wisdom."

In the 1980's Dr. Deak worked with the Laurel School as a consulting psychologist, where she participated in a six-year study with Harvard and a team of researchers led by Carol Gilligan. Following that study, Dr. Deak joined Laurel School as the Director of the Lower School and Director of the Middle School. She also was the founding Director of Early Childhood. She left Laurel in 1999 to expand her consulting role with parents, schools and other organizations nationwide and internationally.


Dr. Deak has been an advisor to Outward Bound, a past chair of the National Committee for Girls and Women in Independent Schools, on the advisory board of New Moon Magazine, the Seattle Girls' School, Bromley Brook School, Lendl Montessori School, Power Play and Girls Can Do. She consults with organizations and schools across the in the United States. Most recently she has worked with international education associations and parent groups in Australia, Borneo, Canada, England, Ethiopia, France, India, Kenya, the Philippines, Nepal, New Zealand, Scotland, South Africa, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. She has been awarded the 2003 Woman of Achievement Award by the National Coalition of Girls' Schools and was given the first Female Educator of the Year Award 2002 by Orchard House School. She has been named the Visiting Scholar in New Zealand in 2004, the Visiting Scholar for The Red Oak School for 2004/2005 and the Resident Scholar for the Gardner Carney Leadership Institute in Colorado Springs for 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Dr. Deak has written two books:
How Girls Thrive, published by the National Association of Independent Schools. 1998

Girls Will Be Girls: Raising Confident and Courageous Daughters, Hyperion. 2002

Co-edited one book:
The Book of Hopes and Dreams

Contributed to two books:
What I Wish You Knew: Letters from Our Daughters' Lives, and Expert Advice on Staying Connected. American Girl. 2001

Written numerous articles and is working on her next book:
The Brain Matters: A Middle of the Road Guide for Parenting and Teaching.


Carol Gilligan, Ph.D.

Professor of Humanities and Applied Psychology
Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

New York University

Carol Gilligan is a psychologist and writer whose 1982 book In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development was described by Harvard University Press as “the little book that started a revolution.” She initiated the Harvard Project on Women’s Psychology and Girls’ Development and co-authored or co-edited five books with her students, including Meeting at the Crossroads (with Lyn Mikel Brown), based on the study at Laurel School and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1992. She is the author of The Birth of Pleasure: A New Map of Love (2002), Kyra: A Novel  (2008), and most recently, Joining the Resistance(2011). A member of the Harvard faculty for many years, she held the university’s first chair in gender studies. She is currently University Professor of Applied Psychology and the Humanities at New York University.

Michael Manos, Ph.D.

Section Head of Pediatric 
Behavioral Medicine
Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Michael Manos is a world-renowned clinician in the field of behavioral pediatrics, learning disabilities and pharmacotherapy, with a particular specialty in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). 

Manos is the director of the ADHD Center for Evaluation and Treatment at the Cleveland Clinic and a member of the ASC’s Advisory Board.


Sally E. Shaywitz, M.D., FAAP

Co-Director for the Center for the Study of Learning and Attention
Department of Pediatrics
Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Sally E. Shaywitz is a professor of Pediatric Neurology at Yale University. She is the author of Overcoming Dyslexia and has published articles in many scientific and popular journals, including NatureJournal of the American Medical AssociationScientific American and Child. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Shaywitz's ground-breaking research focuses on disorders of higher cognitive function in children, adolescents and young adults; of particular interest is the investigation of endocrinologic influences, gender differences and social and behavioral influences underlying dyslexia and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Investigations of endocrinologic and gender influences include examination of the influence of sex hormones on cognitive development during puberty and in a complementary study, hormonal/cognitive relationships in adult women. These studies use functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of hormones on brain organization women. 

Dr. Shaywitz is also engaged in an epidemiologic, longitudinal study of the cognitive and behavioral development of a representative group of 400 Connecticut school children whom we have been following for the past 12 years. This study, the Connecticut Longitudinal Study allows her to characterize the parameters of normal development (intelligence, academic achievement, behavior, school performance, self-perception), and to examine specific influences on these parameters (for example, how much change in IQ over time should be considered "normal" and what is the influence of gender, socioeconomic status, mother's education on IQ variation).

Catherine A. Steiner-Adair, Ed.D.

Research Associate in Psychology
Department of Psychology
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Catherine Steiner-Adair is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Director of Eating Disorders Education and Prevention at the Klarman Eating Disorders Center at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.  She was the recipient of generous funding from the Paul and Phyllis Fireman Foundation to research and develop an eating disorders primary prevention program for girls ages 8-13. Emphasizing girls personal power and overall mental and physical wellness, it addresses critical issues of body preoccupation and reduces risk for disordered eating in girls (grades 3-8). This is the first primary prevention program of its kind to show sustained positive changes in girls body image, body satisfaction and body esteem.

A founding member of the International Academy of Eating Disorders, Dr. Steiner-Adair lectures internationally on eating disorders. In 2001, Dr. Steiner-Adair was invited to write a new forward to the 20th edition of the Golden Cage, the classic text on eating disorders by Hilde Bruch. She was awarded the Lori Irving Prevention Award by the National Eating Disorders Association in September 2005.

Her current research in eating disorders prevention focuses more specifically on ethnicity and cultural sensitivity. With funding from the Hadassah Foundation, she is the co-author of Bishvili, For Me: a Jewish Guide to Full of Ourselves, for Jewish day schools and camps.

Dr. Steiner-Adair consults widely in the American Jewish community with Rabbis, day school and youth educators, health practitioners, parents, camps and non-profit organizations. She has spoken at events for several Jewish Women’s Fund chapters (Chicago, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, New York, Boston, Palm Beach) and Jewish non-profit organizations (The Hadassah Foundation, Jewish Camping Foundation, The Reconstructionist Rabbinical Association, Facing History and Ourselves). Catherine has worked extensively in Israel, speaking publicly and providing professional development at leading hospitals, academic institutions, and the Knesset. In 2006 she was recognized as one of Jewish Women International’s "10 Woman to Watch" for the depth of her work on raising healthy confident girls and preventing eating disorders.

An All-Girls’ Independent College Preparatory School for Grades K-12 and Coed Pre-Primary
Lyman Campus Butler Campus
216.464.1441


Laurel's Mission Statement:


To inspire each girl to
fulfill her promise and
to better the world. 

 

Pre-Primary & Primary School
Open House

Saturday, January 12, 2019
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Lyman Campus

More information

 


"Laurel transforms students into strong women through an exemplary education and an atmosphere built on growth." Caitlin Cronin '16


"During my time at Laurel, I developed the mental aspect of my tennis game -- staying focused and staying in every match. The support that I've gotten from my team and my coaches has really helped me to do that." Danielle Buchinsky '15


"Laurel encourages its girls to try things they think they can do, things they don't think they can do, and even things they never thought about doing." Jazlynn Baker '16


"Laurel is a place where almost every girl can find a home. The community here is extremely accepting and diverse, and every student has her own ideas and opinions that are valued by everyone."Rebecca Brichacek '16


"Confident, independent, open-minded, fearless. That's what comes to mind when I think of what Laurel has given to my daughters." Laurel Parent

 

“The greatest gift Laurel gave me was the gift of lifelong friendships with classmates, teachers and parents of classmates. We have a special bond based on our shared experiences.” 
Betsy Sweeney Backes ‘78

powered by finalsite