All-School Calendar
  • February 2017
    • SatFeb25 US Dance 8:00 PM to 11:00 PM
    • MonFeb27 Dare Week
    • TueFeb28 US Parent Coffee 8:15 AMLyman

The Laurel Swimming Gators were firing on all cylinders at the Northeast Ohio Swimming Districts, which took place on February 17, 2017 at Cleveland State University. In total, the team earned an impressive five spots on the podium and a total of 14 medals. More importantly, four Laurel swimmers qualified for States in three events!

Morgan Miklus ‘19 qualified in both her individual events, the 100 Free and 100 Back, where she placed 2nd in each. The 200 Free Relay team of Morgan Miklus, Katherine Hagen ‘18, Linzy Malcolm ‘20 and Erin Dyke ‘17 also qualified for states after each swimmer dropped at least a half a second from their time.

In addition, the 200 Medley Relay swam by Morgan Miklus, Rose Pophal ‘19, Katherine Hagen, Erin Dyke came in 8th, dropping four seconds off their time and moving two spots up. The 400 Free Relay swam by Katherine Hagen, Victoria Hagen ‘20, Linzy Malcolm, and Erin Dyke placed 8th after dropping an impressive eight seconds from their time to move up three places. Victoria Hagen, placed 16th in the 500 Free and Rylee Betchkal ‘18 moved up four places in her 100 Breaststroke.

Something must have been in the water because of the 19 events that took place, 14 were best times, four were second-best times and one was a second-best season time! Out of 36 teams in attendance Laurel came in 6th! Congratulations to all the swimmers on their hard-earned victories.

We look forward to States!

In her latest New York Times piece titled "When a Teenager's Coping Mechanism Is Spongebob," Lisa Damour Ph.D., delves into some of the typical coping strategies adolescents turn to when faced with stress. She states that "being a teenager isn't easy. Thanks to puberty, neurological and hormonal developments introduce teenagers to an era of emotional fragility so it's no surprise that adolescents find handy, if sometimes quirky, ways to reset when they are feeling overwhelmed."

Laurel Ninth Grader Samantha Eisner was included in the story, explaining that childhood pleasures offer comfort because "they take you back to the days when the biggest problem you had was choosing what crayon to color your dress in your third grade self-portrait."

You can read the full New York Times article here. A second story on the same topic also recently aired on CBS This Morning. Click here to take a look.

 

 

Dr. Tori Cordiano, a clinical psychologist and the Assistant Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls (LCRG), recently contributed to the article "Single Parenting: Communication is Key" in the January/February issue of Your Teen Magazine. In the article she states that "clear, fair communication between single parents and their teens helps to pave the way to a trusting relationship that withstands the ups and downs of adolescence."

Click here to read the full piece.

Cleveland Council on World Affairs Laurel StudentsCompeting against schools with teams of 20-35 students each, Laurel’s five Middle School delegates to the Cleveland Council on World Affairs' Junior Model United Nations Conference at John Carroll University produced three winners!

Representing France in the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, Sarah Goraya '21 and Ria Raj '21 won the Superior Delegation Award, which is the highest group award possible for each committee.

Representing the Netherlands in the Human Rights Commission, Izzy Atzemis '21. brought home the Gavel Award, which is the highest individual award possible for each committee.

In order to achieve these impressive results the students put themselves in the shoes of foreign diplomats and are then able to tackle and find solutions to the most pressing international issues. Through their commitment to the program the participants become empowered to investigate the world, recognize different perspectives, communicate ideas to diverse audiences, and apply what they learn creatively during research, debate, and conference time.

Congratulations to the three award-winners plus Carrie Bifulco '21 and Laine Roberts '21, who also represented Laurel well.

The Cleveland Institute of Art recently announced the winners of the Scholastic Art & Writing Competition. The annual competition is open to local students in Grades 7-12. The panel of judges is comprised of professional artists, art educators, writers and writing educators. As in past years, this year’s competition saw nearly 3,000 pieces of artwork and writing samples.

Congratulations to the following 29 Laurel students who won 35 awards (25 for art and 10 for writing) at this year's Scholastic Art & Writing Competition. Each Gold Key piece will continue to the national competition held in New York City.

 

ART AWARDS:

Gold Keys:

Mia Freer ‘17
Drawing and Illustration

Caroline Kahn ‘17
Photography

Grace Murphy ‘17
Jewelry

Lucia Pabon ‘17
Painting

Micki Reisman ‘17
Ceramics and Glass 

Henley Schulz ‘18
Photography

Christina Steele ‘17
Printmaking

Silver Keys:

Nicole Ahmed ‘17
Ceramics and Glass

Katie Dinner ‘17
Photography 

Isabel Friedman ‘17
Photography 

Ellie Martin ‘17
Painting

Caroline Megerian ‘18
Photography

Audrey Moore ‘17
Ceramics and Glass 

Maggie Navracruz ‘17
Architecture and Industrial Design
*Done at CIA Summer Pre-college program

Julia Saltzman ‘17
Digital Art 

Amanda Shao ‘18
Ceramics and Glass 

Natalie Thomas ‘17
Drawing and Illustration

Adelle Walker ‘17
Jewelry

Honorable Mentions:

Katie Dinner ‘17
Photography

Mia Freer ‘17
Mixed Media 

Alex Harris ‘17
Mixed Media 

Sophie Hatch ‘17
Mixed Media

Bridget Napoli ‘18
Photography

Julia Warner-Corcoran ‘17
Drawing and Illustration

Violet Watterson ‘20
Mixed Media
 

WRITING AWARDS:

Silver Keys:

Madeleine Massey ‘18
Poetry (four entries honored with Silver Keys)

Olivia Savona ‘19
Critical Essay

Brooke Siegler ‘17
Personal Essay/Memoir 

Honorable Mentions:

Madeleine Massey ‘18
Personal Essay/Memoir

Janaan Qutubuddin ‘20
Poetry

Tuyen Reed ‘20
Poetry 

Daania Tahir ‘19
Personal Essay/Memoir

"Parents play a key role in shaping sexual decision-making among adolescents--especially for girls." The Director of Laurel's Center for Research on Girls (LCRG), Dr. Lisa Damour, penned an article in The New York Times on "Talking With Both Daughters and Sons About Sex." Her article highlights a "2016 review of more than three decades of research findings that teenagers who communicated with their parents about sex used safer sexual practices. Likewise, new research from Dutch investigators who studied nearly 3,000 teenagers found that young adolescents who reported feeling close with a parent were unlikely to have had sex when surveyed again two years later. Notably, both research teams found that daughters benefited more than sons, and that the effective conversations and relationships were typically had with mothers."
To read the full article in the New York Times' "Well" blog, click here

Katie Dinner NCSY 2017NCSY held its five-day shabbaton called Yarchei Kallah in New York City, where more than 350 teenagers gathered for Jewish learning and fun. Cleveland brought 30 teens, the most of any region, which included Katie Dinner, a senior at Laurel.

The group began by spending two days touring New York City and ended with an international shabbaton for NCSY, full of Jewish learning and connecting with other Jewsish people from all over the country.

Click here to read the full article.

Beebot Tinkering StationLaurel’s Pre-Primary and Primary tinkering stations were featured in Cleveland.com during computer science week. By tinkering less, girls miss out on opportunities to practice skills such as spatial awareness, mechanical reasoning and critical thinking. During the schools' recent Computer Science Education Week, an annual program dedicated to inspiring K-12 students to take interest in computer science, Laurel offered up extra "tinkering stations" for students that will be used for additional computer science activities through February. Click here to view the entire article.

Benjamin LightWhen Laurel School announced its new Director of Advancement in October, they were pleased to call Benjamin Light one of their own – not an alumna of course, but a parent and a big fan of the school and all things Cleveland.

Benjamin Light comes to Laurel from The Gathering Place, where he was involved in all aspects of the agency's fundraising and special events. He most recently held the position of COO, where he was responsible for all finance and administration of this $2.3 million agency.

Benjamin’s extensive fundraising skills coupled with his strategic thinking and years of experience and knowledge of the corporate and philanthropic landscape in Cleveland make him a strong fit for this role. As a Laurel School parent, he also has a unique perspective on the school's mission and goals.

“This offers new challenges, in a new environment and I wanted to bring my professional energy to another organization.”

Click here for a link to the full article in the December 2016 issue of Currents Magazine. The announcement of Benjamin Light's new appointment was also covered in Crain's Cleveland Business, the Cleveland Jewish News and the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Library – now sometimes referred to as the Learning Common, yet the basics are still in place. Just as business and research collaboration are different today, learning is different, fueled by our access to sources from all over the globe made instantly available. As the worlds of business, science, economics, medicine, and law have changed, so has obtaining and researching information.

Currents talked with professionals at four local private schools to take a look at how and why school libraries have reinvented themselves while still maintaining tradition. Laurel's own Kirsten Rosebrock-Hayes, Middle and Upper Schools Librarian, offered up her insights on how technology has transformed her role at our school. Excerpts from her interview follow.

 “In the role of the librarian I’m a reader’s advisor, Internet Sherpa (I made that up), collection caretaker – I make sure we have reliable and correct information. I wear so many hats,” says Kirsten Rosebrock-Hayes of Laurel School.

In many ways, a librarian’s work as guide and teacher hasn’t changed. In fact, in some ways their work is more pressing and more vital than ever. When faced with the dizzying array of information available, it’s the librarian’s role to teach students to have a discerning eye. 

“A big part of my job is to help students discern what information is worthwhile and trustworthy online,” Rosebrock-Hayes says. “Anyone can post anything online, but do you necessarily want to use just anything in your research project?”

Click here to view the full article from the December 2016 issue of Currents Magazine.

  • February 2017
    • SatFeb25 US Dance 8:00 PM to 11:00 PM
    • MonFeb27 Dare Week
    • TueFeb28 US Parent Coffee 8:15 AMLyman
  • March 2017
    • WedMar01 Ash Wednesday
    • ThuMar02 Coffee with Klotz for Accepted Families Pre-Primary and Primary 8:30 AM to 10:00 AM
    • ThuMar02 US Musical: Little Shop of Horrors 7:00 PMLyman, Chapel
    • FriMar03 US Musical: Little Shop of Horrors 7:00 PMLyman, Chapel
    • SatMar04 US Musical: Little Shop of Horrors 7:00 PMLyman, Chapel
    • MonMar06 Dream Week
    • MonMar06 MS Spring Sports Begin
    • MonMar06 US Track Practice Begins
    • MonMar06 US Track Parent Meeting 6:00 PMLyman
    • MonMar06 Grade 4 Art Show Opening 6:30 PM to 7:30 PMLyman

Leadership & Advisory Panel

Laurel's Center for Research on Girls Leadership & Advisory

Ann V. Klotz ~ Founder

Head of School
Laurel School

Ann V. Klotz photoAnn V. Klotz began her tenure as Laurel’s tenth Head of School on July 1, 2004. Committed to academic excellence, Klotz is equally devoted to the social and emotional development of girls and enthusiastically champions Laurel’s legacy as a school that fosters confidence, creativity, critical thinking and compassion in its students.

As a graduate of The Agnes Irwin School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, Klotz experienced first-hand the opportunities afforded girls who are educated in an environment dedicated to their particular strengths and needs. A cum laude graduate of Yale, she obtained her Master of Arts degree from New York University where she majored in Individual Study of Drama.

Prior to her arrival at Laurel, Klotz spent twenty years as an educator and administrator at The Chapin School in New York City. She served as Director of College Guidance and as a member of Chapin’s administrative team, while maintaining ongoing roles as head of the Drama Department, coordinator of the Fine Arts Department and teacher of Upper School English. Klotz continues to help lead the highly successful summer program for high schools students she and her husband, Seth Orbach, established in Pennsylvania - the Ensemble Theatre Community School.

Klotz is a graduate of Leadership Cleveland, sits on the Board of Directors of City Year, Inc. and is a member of the National Leadership Council for Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital. She also served as the 2007-2008 Board Chair of the Cleveland Council of Independent Schools (CCIS), a consortium of Northeast Ohio independent schools.

Contact Ann at aKlotz@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-455-3000

Lisa Damour, Ph.D. ~ Director

Department of Psychology
Case Western Reserve University

Consulting Psychologist
Laurel School

Dr. Lisa DamourLisa Damour, Ph.D. is the Director of Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls. After graduating with honors from Yale University, Dr. Damour received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Michigan. She has worked for the Yale Child Study Center and is the recipient of training fellowships from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Yale’s Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy, and the University of Michigan’s Power Foundation.

Dr. Damour is the author of numerous academic papers, chapters, and books related to education and child development. She is co-author with Dr. James Hansell of Abnormal Psychology, a widely-used college textbook and co-author with Dr. Anne Curzan of First Day to Final Grade, a handbook introducing college instructors to the art and craft of teaching. Her forthcoming book for parents of teenage girls will be published by Ballantine Books, a division of Random House.

Dr. Damour maintains a private psychotherapy practice, consults and speaks internationally, and is a faculty associate of the Schubert Center for Child Studies and a clinical instructor at Case Western Reserve University.

Contact Lisa at lDamour@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-455-3061

Tori Cordiano, Ph.D. ~ Assistant Director

Department of Psychology
John Carroll University

Consulting Psychologist
Laurel School

Tori Cordiano, Ph.D. is the Assistant Director of Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls. She is dedicated to the practical application of empirical research on girls' learning and development and to thinking about new avenues for exploring how girls grow.

Dr. Cordiano graduated with honors from Case Western Reserve University where she also received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology. She was the recipient of the Brisky Fellowship for her research in the area of children's pretend play and creativity.

Dr. Cordiano is the co-author of several book chapters and research papers related to pretend play, play assessment, children's creativity, and parenting interventions. She teaches in the master's counseling program at John Carroll University and in the doctoral physical therapy program at Cleveland State University. Dr. Cordiano maintains a private practice, where she specializes in psychotherapy and assessment with children, adolescents, and families.

Contact Tori at tCordiano@LaurelSchool.org or phone 216-751-5442

Eileen P. Anderson-Fye, Ed.D

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
Case Western Reserve University


Eileen P. Anderson-Fye, Ed.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Case Western Reserve University whose research centers around the well-being of adolescents in contexts of socio-cultural change.  She studies how adolescents - already going through normative developmental changes - make sense of changing contexts around them in ways that both help and hinder their well-being, and particularly mental health.  Dr. Anderson-Fye's work aims to identify and explain processes by which adolescents engage in pathways to well-being or distress with the ultimate aim of interventions in practice and policy to increase adolescent well-being and reduce distress. 

Dr. Anderson-Fye's work has appeared in a variety of scholarly publications including the "Harvard Educational Review," "Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry," "ETHOS," "The International Encyclopedia of Adolescence," and "The Handbook of Eating Disorders and Obesity."


Anne Curzan, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of English
University of Michigan

Professor Anne Curzan is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Michigan. She also has a faculty appointment in the School of Education. Professor Curzan's research interests include the history of English, language and gender, corpus linguistics, medieval language and literature, historical sociolinguistics, pedagogy, and lexicography. In addition to her teaching, research, and administrative posts in the English Department, Professor Curzan is co-editor of the Journal of English Linguistics.
Professor Curzan's published work includes:
How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction. 2006. 
With Michael Adams. New York: Pearson/Longman.
Gender Shifts in the History of English. 2003. 
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
First Day to Final Grade: A Graduate Student’s Guide to Teaching. 2nd Ed. 2006. With Lisa Damour. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Studies in the History of the English Language II: Unfolding Conversations. 2004. Ed. with Kimberly Emmons. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Numerous articles and book reviews.

JoAnn Deak, Ph.D.

Principal, The Deak Group

JoAnn Deak, Ph.D., has spent more than twenty years as an educator and psychologist, helping children develop into confident and competent adults. The latter half of that period has focused on working with parents and teachers in their roles as guides for children. On her website is a quote that best describes her perspective on her work: "Every interaction a child has, during the course of a day, influences the adult that child will become." 

Parents and educators from schools in the United States and abroad, as well as organizations such as the National Association of Independent Schools, International Schools Association of Africa, etc., have heralded Dr. Deak's ability to demystify complex issues of child development, learning, identify formation and brain research. Mary Pipher, author of Reviving Ophelia and The Shelter of Each Other has called Dr. Deak "an earnest idealist and a 
rigorous researcher... a good combination of head and heart." Michael Thompson, author of Raising Cain and Best Friends, Worst Enemies, has said that her writing "offers parents humor, understanding, parenting philosophy, and well founded words of wisdom."

In the 1980's Dr. Deak worked with the Laurel School as a consulting psychologist, where she participated in a six-year study with Harvard and a team of researchers led by Carol Gilligan. Following that study, Dr. Deak joined Laurel School as the Director of the Lower School and Director of the Middle School. She also was the founding Director of Early Childhood. She left Laurel in 1999 to expand her consulting role with parents, schools and other organizations nationwide and internationally.


Dr. Deak has been an advisor to Outward Bound, a past chair of the National Committee for Girls and Women in Independent Schools, on the advisory board of New Moon Magazine, the Seattle Girls' School, Bromley Brook School, Lendl Montessori School, Power Play and Girls Can Do. She consults with organizations and schools across the in the United States. Most recently she has worked with international education associations and parent groups in Australia, Borneo, Canada, England, Ethiopia, France, India, Kenya, the Philippines, Nepal, New Zealand, Scotland, South Africa, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. She has been awarded the 2003 Woman of Achievement Award by the National Coalition of Girls' Schools and was given the first Female Educator of the Year Award 2002 by Orchard House School. She has been named the Visiting Scholar in New Zealand in 2004, the Visiting Scholar for The Red Oak School for 2004/2005 and the Resident Scholar for the Gardner Carney Leadership Institute in Colorado Springs for 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Dr. Deak has written two books:
How Girls Thrive, published by the National Association of Independent Schools. 1998

Girls Will Be Girls: Raising Confident and Courageous Daughters, Hyperion. 2002

Co-edited one book:
The Book of Hopes and Dreams

Contributed to two books:
What I Wish You Knew: Letters from Our Daughters' Lives, and Expert Advice on Staying Connected. American Girl. 2001

Written numerous articles and is working on her next book:
The Brain Matters: A Middle of the Road Guide for Parenting and Teaching.


Carol Gilligan, Ph.D.

Professor of Humanities and Applied Psychology
Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

New York University

Carol Gilligan is a psychologist and writer whose 1982 book In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development was described by Harvard University Press as “the little book that started a revolution.” She initiated the Harvard Project on Women’s Psychology and Girls’ Development and co-authored or co-edited five books with her students, including Meeting at the Crossroads (with Lyn Mikel Brown), based on the study at Laurel School and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1992. She is the author of The Birth of Pleasure: A New Map of Love (2002), Kyra: A Novel  (2008), and most recently, Joining the Resistance(2011). A member of the Harvard faculty for many years, she held the university’s first chair in gender studies. She is currently University Professor of Applied Psychology and the Humanities at New York University.

Michael Manos, Ph.D.

Section Head of Pediatric 
Behavioral Medicine
Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Michael Manos is a world-renowned clinician in the field of behavioral pediatrics, learning disabilities and pharmacotherapy, with a particular specialty in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). 

Manos is the director of the ADHD Center for Evaluation and Treatment at the Cleveland Clinic and a member of the ASC’s Advisory Board.


Sally E. Shaywitz, M.D., FAAP

Co-Director for the Center for the Study of Learning and Attention
Department of Pediatrics
Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Sally E. Shaywitz is a professor of Pediatric Neurology at Yale University. She is the author of Overcoming Dyslexia and has published articles in many scientific and popular journals, including NatureJournal of the American Medical AssociationScientific American and Child. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Shaywitz's ground-breaking research focuses on disorders of higher cognitive function in children, adolescents and young adults; of particular interest is the investigation of endocrinologic influences, gender differences and social and behavioral influences underlying dyslexia and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Investigations of endocrinologic and gender influences include examination of the influence of sex hormones on cognitive development during puberty and in a complementary study, hormonal/cognitive relationships in adult women. These studies use functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of hormones on brain organization women. 

Dr. Shaywitz is also engaged in an epidemiologic, longitudinal study of the cognitive and behavioral development of a representative group of 400 Connecticut school children whom we have been following for the past 12 years. This study, the Connecticut Longitudinal Study allows her to characterize the parameters of normal development (intelligence, academic achievement, behavior, school performance, self-perception), and to examine specific influences on these parameters (for example, how much change in IQ over time should be considered "normal" and what is the influence of gender, socioeconomic status, mother's education on IQ variation).

Catherine A. Steiner-Adair, Ed.D.

Research Associate in Psychology
Department of Psychology
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Catherine Steiner-Adair is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Director of Eating Disorders Education and Prevention at the Klarman Eating Disorders Center at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.  She was the recipient of generous funding from the Paul and Phyllis Fireman Foundation to research and develop an eating disorders primary prevention program for girls ages 8-13. Emphasizing girls personal power and overall mental and physical wellness, it addresses critical issues of body preoccupation and reduces risk for disordered eating in girls (grades 3-8). This is the first primary prevention program of its kind to show sustained positive changes in girls body image, body satisfaction and body esteem.

A founding member of the International Academy of Eating Disorders, Dr. Steiner-Adair lectures internationally on eating disorders. In 2001, Dr. Steiner-Adair was invited to write a new forward to the 20th edition of the Golden Cage, the classic text on eating disorders by Hilde Bruch. She was awarded the Lori Irving Prevention Award by the National Eating Disorders Association in September 2005.

Her current research in eating disorders prevention focuses more specifically on ethnicity and cultural sensitivity. With funding from the Hadassah Foundation, she is the co-author of Bishvili, For Me: a Jewish Guide to Full of Ourselves, for Jewish day schools and camps.

Dr. Steiner-Adair consults widely in the American Jewish community with Rabbis, day school and youth educators, health practitioners, parents, camps and non-profit organizations. She has spoken at events for several Jewish Women’s Fund chapters (Chicago, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, New York, Boston, Palm Beach) and Jewish non-profit organizations (The Hadassah Foundation, Jewish Camping Foundation, The Reconstructionist Rabbinical Association, Facing History and Ourselves). Catherine has worked extensively in Israel, speaking publicly and providing professional development at leading hospitals, academic institutions, and the Knesset. In 2006 she was recognized as one of Jewish Women International’s "10 Woman to Watch" for the depth of her work on raising healthy confident girls and preventing eating disorders.

An All-Girls’ Independent College Preparatory School for Grades K-12 and Coed Pre-Primary
Lyman Campus Butler Campus
216.464.1441


Laurel's Mission Statement:


To inspire each girl to
fulfill her promise and
to better the world. 

 

Middle and Upper School Open House

Saturday, April 8, 2017
10:30 am-12:30 pm
Lyman Campus

More information and RSVP
coming soon


"Laurel transforms students into strong women through an exemplary education and an atmosphere built on growth." Caitlin Cronin '16


"During my time at Laurel, I developed the mental aspect of my tennis game -- staying focused and staying in every match. The support that I've gotten from my team and my coaches has really helped me to do that." Danielle Buchinsky '15


"Laurel encourages its girls to try things they think they can do, things they don't think they can do, and even things they never thought about doing." Jazlynn Baker '16


"Laurel is a place where almost every girl can find a home. The community here is extremely accepting and diverse, and every student has her own ideas and opinions that are valued by everyone."Rebecca Brichacek '16


"Confident, independent, open-minded, fearless. That's what comes to mind when I think of what Laurel has given to my daughters." Laurel Parent

 

“The greatest gift Laurel gave me was the gift of lifelong friendships with classmates, teachers and parents of classmates. We have a special bond based on our shared experiences.” 
Betsy Sweeney Backes ‘78

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